20th of June 2010
 
anneyhall:

Ziegfeld Follies, 1923.

anneyhall:

Ziegfeld Follies, 1923.

 
Helene Clive

Helene Clive

19th of June 2010
 
pictures-of-lilly:

edwardianera:

Anna Held
 
extranuance:

Ziegfeld Follies girl Helene Clive (wife of artist Henry Clive)
Photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston

extranuance:

Ziegfeld Follies girl Helene Clive (wife of artist Henry Clive)

Photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston

 
The Dolly Sisters, with their dollies

The Dolly Sisters, with their dollies

18th of June 2010
 
Mary Nolan

Mary Nolan

 
Mary Nolan - December 18, 1905 - October 31, 1948
Born Mary Imogene Robertson in Kentucky,  Robertson’s childhood was beset with hardship that included the death  of her mother in 1908 and an absent father. As a child, she worked as a  farm laborer, before moving to New  York City in 1919 where she worked as a model. Before long, she was discovered by Florenz Ziegfeld, who hired her under the name Imogene  Wilson (the first of three name changes she was to have) as a dancer in  his follies.  As a showgirl in New York she was called Bubbles. Her impact as a  dancer was so profound that columnist Mark Hellinger once said of her  in 1922: "Only two people in America would bring every reporter in  New York to the docks to see them off. One is the President. The other  is Imogene "Bubbles" Wilson."

Mary Nolan - December 18, 1905 - October 31, 1948

Born Mary Imogene Robertson in Kentucky, Robertson’s childhood was beset with hardship that included the death of her mother in 1908 and an absent father. As a child, she worked as a farm laborer, before moving to New York City in 1919 where she worked as a model. Before long, she was discovered by Florenz Ziegfeld, who hired her under the name Imogene Wilson (the first of three name changes she was to have) as a dancer in his follies. As a showgirl in New York she was called Bubbles. Her impact as a dancer was so profound that columnist Mark Hellinger once said of her in 1922: "Only two people in America would bring every reporter in New York to the docks to see them off. One is the President. The other is Imogene "Bubbles" Wilson."

16th of June 2010
 
Dorothy Wegman

Dorothy Wegman

 
Dorothy Wegman
November 27, 1904 - November 7, 2005
She was born  Dorothy Wegman on Nov. 27, 1904, in New York to Eastern European  immigrants and dropped out of school at 14 to support her widowed mother  and younger brother. Steered toward the stage by her mother, the  reluctant girl made her debut as a dancer in a Shubert revue, “The  Passing Show of 1921” at Broadway’s Winter Garden Theater.
Ziegfeld cast her in his “Follies of 1924,” and she later performed in  his shows “Big Boy” and “Rio Rita.” In 1927, during the “Rio Rita” run,  she eloped with playwright Samson Raphaelson. She remained married to  him until his death in 1983.
In 1930, she wrote a novel about her experiences as a Ziegfeld Girl entitled “Glorified”.

Dorothy Wegman

November 27, 1904 - November 7, 2005

She was born Dorothy Wegman on Nov. 27, 1904, in New York to Eastern European immigrants and dropped out of school at 14 to support her widowed mother and younger brother. Steered toward the stage by her mother, the reluctant girl made her debut as a dancer in a Shubert revue, “The Passing Show of 1921” at Broadway’s Winter Garden Theater.

Ziegfeld cast her in his “Follies of 1924,” and she later performed in his shows “Big Boy” and “Rio Rita.” In 1927, during the “Rio Rita” run, she eloped with playwright Samson Raphaelson. She remained married to him until his death in 1983.

In 1930, she wrote a novel about her experiences as a Ziegfeld Girl entitled “Glorified”.

13th of June 2010
 
thetranscendentalmodernist:


Ziegfeld Girl
Tata Leonova
12th of June 2010
 
Sheet Music Cover from the “Ziegfeld Follies of 1916”

Sheet Music Cover from the “Ziegfeld Follies of 1916”

 
Alice Wilkie
Photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston

Alice Wilkie

Photo by Alfred Cheney Johnston

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